Local News Roundup: Post-Election Edition

On the next Charlotte Talks local news roundup …

The election night that we’ve been gearing up for over the last four years arrived this week … and lingered. We’ll talk about the big local and state races as well as where local voters showed up for presidential candidates — and where possible, we’ll provide results.

There was no widespread violence in North Carolina on Election Day, but an arrest in the University City-area precinct, a march in Alamance that ended in a pepper spray incident the weekend prior to the election and an overnight march in Raleigh on election night could be the first in demonstrations about results here and around the country.

Charlotte’s three bond referendums took easy victories in the election this week, approving spending of over $197 million for transportation, affordable housing and neighborhood improvements. We’ll talk about exactly where that money will go.

Those stories and an update on COVID-19 in North Carolina as Mike Collins and our roundtable of reporters delve into this week’s top stories on the Charlotte Talks local news roundup.

Local News Roundup: COVID-19 Numbers Up In NC; Vance High Gets New Name; Early Voting; Remembering Judy Williams

On the next Charlotte Talks Local News Roundup:

North Carolina’s coronavirus numbers are creeping back up under Phase 3, and state Health and Human Services Secretary Mandy Cohen urges residents to remain vigilant, stating that she’s no longer able to pinpoint a specific location or cause, and that “this virus is everywhere.”

CMS begins its first round of in-person classes this week as Pre-K students return to school. We’ll get an update on how that went as well as other CMS news, including the week’s COVID-19 numbers and the renaming of Vance High School.

Early voting started this week in North Carolina, and candidates are descending on Charlotte and other locations around the state. We’ll give an update on all things “election,” including how potential voters are responding to news of the scandal in Cal Cunningham’s campaign, and record money raised by South Carolina candidate for U.S. Senate Jaime Harrison.

And we remember Judy Williams, the co-founder of Mothers of Murdered Offspring and anti-violence advocate in Charlotte who supported countless families of murder victims. She died last week after a battle with lung cancer.

Mike Collins and our roundtable of reporters bring the week’s top news in the local news roundup.

Guests:

Erik Spanberg, managing editor for the Charlotte Business Journal.

Glenn Burkins, founder and publisher of qcitymetro.com.

Ann Doss Helms, WFAE’s Education Reporter.

Mary C. Curtis, columnist for Rollcall.com, host of the Rollcall podcast “Equal Time” and contributor at WCCB-TV.

POLITICAL WRAP: Mixed Messages on President’s Health; Cal Cunningham Text Scandal

CHARLOTTE, N.C. – Mixed messages this weekend about President Trump’s health, as he remains hospitalized at Walter Reed Medical Center.

And North Carolina’s Senate race, upended by revelations Democrat Cal Cunningham sent sexually suggestive text messages to a California strategist, who is not his wife.

Our political contributor Mary C. Curtis has more in the video above.

Charlotte Talks Local News Roundup: Phase 3 Reopening, CMS Adjusts Return Plan, CMPD Officers Resign

On the local news roundup, North Carolina moves into Phase 3 of reopening. With the state’s coronavirus metrics stable, Gov. Roy Cooper is easing restrictions to allow bars and other entertainment venues to open with reduced capacity. We find out what that means and check in our COVID-19 numbers.

The first CMS students began returning to the classroom this week, with more on the way. And the school board holds an emergency meeting to adjust their return to school plan for elementary students.

Five CMPD officers connected to the in-custody death of Harold Easter resign ahead of video release.

And county elections boards across the state have begun to process tens of thousands of absentee ballots.

Our roundtable of reporters fills us in on those stories and more.

Guests

Steve Harrison, WFAE’s Political Reporter

Claire Donnelly, WFAE’s health reporter

Mary C. Curtis, columnist for Rollcall.com and WCCB-TV

Nick Ochsner, Chief Investigative Reporter at WBTV

Ann Doss Helms, WFAE’s education reporter

Mary C. Curtis: First Debate in a Key Race in North Carolina

CHARLOTTE, N.C. — All eyes are on North Carolina, not just because its 15 electoral votes will be key in what is expected to be a close presidential race. The U.S. Senate contest between Republican incumbent Thom Tillis and Democrat Cal Cunningham is also close, according to polls, and could help determine which party controls the Senate.

Big money has already been spent in the Senate race.

What can voters learn from their first debate? WCCB Political Contributor Mary C. Curtis weighs in.

Why North Carolina Matters In 2020

How competitive will North Carolina be in 2020? We talk about the presidential race, a tough battle for Republican Sen. Thom Tillis and the hyperpolarization of local politics in the state.

Host Jeremy Hobson is joined by Jeff Tiberii (@j_tibs), Capitol Bureau Chief at WUNC and Mary Curtis (@mcurtisnc3), columnist at Roll Call based in Charlotte.

Long arc of history guides John Lewis in his call for impeachment inquiry

OPINION — No one can accuse Rep. John Lewis of lacking patience. The Georgia Democrat showed plenty, as well as steely resolve, as he changed millions of minds — and history — over a life spent working for equal rights for all. So when he speaks, especially about justice, a cause from which he has never wavered, all would do well to listen.

Lewis was not the only voice raised this week, as all sides raced to place a political frame on the narrative of the undisputed fact that a U.S. president asked a foreign leader to work with him and for him to smear a political opponent, perhaps with military aid in the balance. “I would like you to do us a favor though because our country has been through a lot and Ukraine knows a lot about it,” President Donald Trump said, according to a transcript of the conversation based on notes. He also wanted to rope in his personal lawyer and the attorney general, who, by the way, works for the American people, not Trump.

No direct quid pro quo but plenty of bread crumbs leading to the conclusion that a country dependent on funds to deal with, among other things, an extremely aggressive Russian neighbor, better pay attention.

Charlotte Talks Local News Roundup: Panthers May Move HQ To SC; New Candidates For 9th District

The news in the 9th Congressional District continues as candidate filing opened this week in the 9th District’s new race. This comes after the State Election Board ordered a new election because evidence of election fraud was uncovered. We’ll discuss the latest on who is putting their name in the hat.

We’ll also give you an update of the ongoing investigation into the 9th District, including new details from search warrants released this week.

Carolina Panthers Owner David Tepper went across state lines to meet with Governor Henry McMaster of South Carolina this week, and McMaster says the state will be working on legislation to help the team to move its corporate headquarters and practice fields to the state. What implications will this have for the future of the team and the stadium in Charlotte, and what is Charlotte’s response?

In addition to a possible move, the Panthers say that Bank of America Stadium is overvalued by as much as $485 million and the value should be cut.

A nationwide college admissions cheating scheme was made public this week when dozens of people were charged with fraud at universities around the country. North Carolina was not immune, as Wake Forest University’s volleyball coach appeared on the list of those in the case.

Charlotte Talks host Mike Collins and a panel of journalists cover those stories and much more on the Local News Roundup.

Guests:

Ely Portillo, reporter for the Charlotte Observer

Mary C. Curtis, columnist for Rollcall.com and WCCB

David Boraks, reporter for WFAE

Steve Harrison, WFAE’s political reporter

Opinion: Saying ‘Not Trump’ Is Not Enough for GOP

When Donald Trump is the bad cop, everybody can be the good cop.

The State of North Carolina after Midterms

CHARLOTTE, NC- It’s been one week since mid term elections wrapped up, but where does North Carolina stand now. Is the state red, blue or somewhere in the middle? Political Contributor Mary Curtis says even though the state voted Republican, it’s not necessarily red. Recent races have shown small margins of victory, pointing to problems like voter turnout. For Democrats to be successful in the future, she says the party needs to work on getting more voters to the polls, have a good slate of candidates and sell their message.