Donald Trump, Confederates and the GOP — brethren in the new Lost Cause

You can tell a lot about people by studying their priorities.

President Donald Trump is not spending too much time worrying about coronavirus surges and more than 270,000 Americans dead, as Dr. Anthony Fauci offers warnings about being vigilant while waiting for vaccine distribution. You did not hear the president express sympathy for those waiting in long lines for food over the holidays.

Instead, he has played a lot of golf and wailed on Twitter and television, refusing to accept his loss last month to President-elect Joseph R. Biden Jr. Oh, yes, and the Justice Department found time to amend protocols to allow firing squads and electrocutions as a means to execute as many federal prisoners as possible before a new administration takes over.

Trump is also forging ahead with his campaign promise to veto the annual National Defense Authorization Act if changes are not made. There are several items in both House and Senate versions, including on troop movement and, most recently, liability protection for social media companies, over which legislators themselves and the president are still haggling. However, a bipartisan provision that has set Trump off for quite awhile is one that would rename bases and remove symbols from military installations that honor Confederate generals and leaders. This is despite consensus not only from both parties but also from members of the

POLITICAL WRAP: COVID-19 & the Presidential Transition

CHARLOTTE, N.C. – Dr. Anthony Fauci says “it would be better” if health officials in the Trump administration could start working with the incoming Biden-Harris team on the country’s efforts to battle COVID-19.

It comes as President Trump refuses to concede and marchers converge on Washington to support him.

Our political contributor Mary C. Curtis has more in the video above.

Local News Roundup: Post-Election Edition

On the next Charlotte Talks local news roundup …

The election night that we’ve been gearing up for over the last four years arrived this week … and lingered. We’ll talk about the big local and state races as well as where local voters showed up for presidential candidates — and where possible, we’ll provide results.

There was no widespread violence in North Carolina on Election Day, but an arrest in the University City-area precinct, a march in Alamance that ended in a pepper spray incident the weekend prior to the election and an overnight march in Raleigh on election night could be the first in demonstrations about results here and around the country.

Charlotte’s three bond referendums took easy victories in the election this week, approving spending of over $197 million for transportation, affordable housing and neighborhood improvements. We’ll talk about exactly where that money will go.

Those stories and an update on COVID-19 in North Carolina as Mike Collins and our roundtable of reporters delve into this week’s top stories on the Charlotte Talks local news roundup.

In North Carolina, red and blue don’t make purple

North Carolina is a political player, a battleground state visited and fought over by national candidates in both parties. And Charlotte has had challenges that mirror those of many big American cities: protests and debates over police reform and frustrations that all citizens don’t share in its economic growth and opportunity. Mary C. Curtis speaks to Charlotte Mayor Vi Lyles about the election and what comes next.

POLITICAL WRAP: Two Days until the Election

CHARLOTTE, N.C. – Two days until Election Day and early voting records show a tight race and an involved electorate.

Candidates and their families are flooding North Carolina in the closing days of the campaign.

So, will we know the results on Election Night?

Some political experts say we might not know who won for days or weeks.

Our political contributor Mary C. Curtis gives us her take as we approach Election Day.

Mary C. Curtis: Will A Supreme Court Justice Sway The Presidential Race?

CHARLOTTE, NC — In her first week on the job, Justice Amy Coney Barrett could be weighing in on a number of important cases piling up in the Supreme Court, including several related to next week’s election.

WCCB political contributor Mary C. Curtis weighs-in on what kind of impact Barrett could have on the presidential race.

POLITICAL WRAP: Comparing COVID Responses; Supreme Court Nominee Vote on Monday

CHARLOTTE, N.C. – The parties, taking different approaches as the U.S. reaches a daily record high number of COVID cases.

Meantime, Vice President Mike Pence remains on the campaign trail, despite several of his aides testing positive.

Our political contributor Mary C. Curtis has more on this and on Monday’s expected conformation of Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett.

What’s in a name? Identity, pride and love. Ask Kamala Harris

Every person’s name is special. It demands respect.

I learned how seriously I felt about that at a pre-coronavirus conference, when a speaker who fancied himself Don Rickles but came off more like the rude uncle at a holiday party, prefaced his remarks with a self-styled roast. It supposedly poked “fun” at the attendees, including, apparently, those he barely knew. (And frankly, except for an occasional greeting at conferences past, I did not know this man from a can of paint.)

Mary C. Curtis: Candidates Try to Close Deal in North Carolina

CHARLOTTE, NC — Less than 2 weeks until election day and both campaigns are making their rounds to key states including, North Carolina.

WCCB political contributor Mary C. Curtis talks about the candidates final push ahead of November 3rd.

POLITICAL WRAP: Candidates in North Carolina; Final Presidential Debate

CHARLOTTE, N.C. – Two weeks and two days until the November 3rd election.

Millions across the country have already voted early, including more than 98,000 people in Mecklenburg County.

The candidates are in our area this week, fighting for any voters who remain undecided.

President Trump will hold a rally in Gastonia on Wednesday, while former Vice President Joe Biden spent the day Sunday in Durham.

Our political contributor Mary C. Curtis has more in the video above.