Previewing 2020 Democratic Debates

CHARLOTTE, N.C. — The first debates of the 2020 presidential election are here. 20 Democrats will face off in a two-night debate Wednesday and Thursday in Miami.

Each candidate will have a minimum amount of time to make a maximum impact. The stakes may be even higher for those at the bottom of the polls, because their campaigns need attention and money to continue.

So, what should viewers look for, in addition to that memorable moment that can make or break a campaign?

Mary Curtis weighs in.

As Democrats line up to debate, the GOP is regressing

OPINION — It was pretty startling, actually, viewing the lineup for the first debate of Democratic presidential hopefuls in April 2007 on a stage in Orangeburg, South Carolina. Among them were the usual suspects — Sens. Chris Dodd, John Edwards and Joe Biden. And then, there were surprises — Gov. Bill Richardson of New Mexico and Sens. Hillary Clinton and Barack Obama.

This is different, I thought. Whatever happens next, this looks like America, an America I had rarely experienced except in the aspirational promises of its founding documents, with the few exceptions of pioneers such as Shirley Chisholm or Jesse Jackson, when it came to choosing presidents.

When I covered the second Republican debate in May of that year, in Columbia, South Carolina, distinguishing between the candidates was a little tougher at first glance.

Wednesday’s Presidential Debate: A Reality TV Show Gone Bad

It was all going so well Wednesday night, with moderator Chris Wallace keeping the audience relatively quiet and the candidates focused on issues — the Supreme Court, Roe v. Wade, immigration and gun control.

But then it became a reality TV show gone bad, with the worst cliffhanger ever, when Donald Trump promised to keep the country “in suspense” when asked if he would accept the results of the Nov. 8 election.

Debate No. 3 and Donald Trump’s ‘Election Rigging’ Theories

CHARLOTTE, NC — President Obama now addressing Donald Trump’s repeated claims of election rigging and fraud, calling the comments “irresponsible.” That’s expected to be one of the big talkers at the final presidential debate in Las Vegas, with Emmy award-winning journalist Chris Wallace cast as tonight’s moderator. Our political contributor Mary C. Curtis joins us for more.

Highlights & Low Blows of First Senate Debate: Hagan v. Tillis


CHARLOTTE, N.C. — The first of three senate debates between candidates Senator Kay Hagan and House Speaker Thom Tillis is in the books. As with all debates, there were highlights and low blows. So, did their arguments give them enough momentum? Our WCCB Polticial Contributor Mary C. Curtis breaks down what worked and what didn’t. Hagan and Tillis weren’t at odds over everything – they agreed that President Obama needs to take action against ISIS.