Opinion: Supreme Court Resurrects the ‘Purge,’ and McConnell Saw It Coming

It was a brilliant and, opponents would say, devious move by Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell: Stall, obstruct and block President Barack Obama’s Supreme Court replacement for the late Antonin Scalia.

That pick, Judge Merrick Garland, once a thoroughly acceptable and moderate choice to many Republicans, never had a chance in a ramped-up partisan atmosphere. Instead, the next president, Donald Trump, appointed conservative Neil Gorsuch, with immediate and long-lasting repercussions, this week reaching into the voting booth.

By a 5-4 vote in Husted v. A. Philip Randolph Institute, the conservatives on the court reaffirmed an Ohio law an appeals court had rejected as being a violation of the National Voter Registration Act, which says states cannot purge voters for failing to vote but can figure out how to remove those who have moved or died from the list. The state — a crucial battleground — has a particularly stringent test, using failure to vote in a single federal election cycle as the trigger to start the process.

Singapore Summit: Was It a First Step to Peace?

CHARLOTTE, NC — As promised, the June 12 summit between U.S. President Donald Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong Un took place in Singapore, with flags of both countries, the red carpet and a much-photographed handshake. Dennis Rodman even showed up, giving the occasion a reality-show air.

But what was accomplished and what happens next?

Opinion: Don’t Expect to See Bill Clinton Campaigning for Hopeful Democrats

In the Wednesday morning quarterbacking after Hillary Clinton’s unexpected loss to Donald Trump in the 2016 presidential race, one criticism was that she had not employed that consummate politician former President Bill Clinton enough in her campaign, to speak to “the people” he could connect with and she could not.

But for all the mistakes the Clinton 2016 campaign operation and the candidate herself made — and there were plenty — sidelining Bill was not one of them.

Education or Segregation? Fight Over HB 514

CHARLOTTE, NC — It’s called House Bill 514, steadily working its way through the North Carolina General Assembly, and if passed, it could change North Carolina’s education landscape in historic ways. What is at stake?

Charlotte Talks Local News Roundup: State Budget On Fast Track; Panthers Respond To NFL Policy

On the next Charlotte Talks local news roundup…

Budget season is well underway. We’ve already discussed city and countybudget on Charlotte Talks. And now on Monday, the proposed state budget was released, and is on the fast track in the legislature.

The budget has many educational components. We’ll discuss teacher and principal pay… and the $200,000 set aside for a non-profit that gives money to classroom teachers- and why that’s turning heads.

We’ll discuss the status of the house bill that would allow area towns to create their own charters and budget talk that concerns the I-77 toll lanes under construction in Northern Mecklenburg.

We delve into the response of Carolina Panthers players to the new NFL Anthem Policy and about the conversation new Panthers’ owner David Tepper had with the team about the NFL owners meeting last week.

City Council has endorsed a plan to increase pay for Charlotte-Mecklenburg Police Officers. The city has cut ties with a developer who has not delivered on affordable housing near the light rail. And Cardinal Health is back in the news, as the former CEO files yet another lawsuit.

Guest host Erik Spanberg from the Charlotte Business Journal and our roundtable of reporters go through these stories and more on the Charlotte Talks Local News Roundup.

Guests:

Glenn Burkins, editor and publisher of Q City Metro 

Ann Doss Helms, reporter for the Charlotte Observer 

Nick OchsnerWBTV news reporter

Mary C. Curtis, columnist for Rollcall.com and WCCB 

Opinion: No Holiday in the United States of Exhaustion

In overworked America, with national holidays too few and far between, citizens look forward to each one. Memorial Day, especially, is a time of unity — a day to honor those who have served and sacrificed, without regard to political party or philosophy.

This year, though, that always delicate truce seemed particularly fraught.

Memorial Day 2018 resembled a Monday like too many others — the beginning of a week of sniping and fighting and irreconcilable views of what it means to be a patriot in these anything but United States. It also was a reminder that my commentary on the intersection of politics, culture and race is so spot-on, it’s depressing, and that those common experiences that Americans imagined we all shared were a mirage — if they were ever real.

What Is the Line Between Politics and Culture? Ask Roseanne.

CHARLOTTE, NC– After Roseanne tweeted a racist insult, her hit TV show was canceled. Entertainment, as well as sports, supposed escapes, are political in 2018.

Mary C. Curtis weighs in.

 

Opinion: A Not Entirely Unexpected Campaign Roadblock for Women of Color

The women of color who are still standing in an electoral slog that ends in November know their road to continued success will be hard. This is the United States, and the fact that they are still pioneers for getting this far in 2018 is not just news-making but also a little depressing.

It is also true that they can’t always count on the support of some of the same feminists they may have joined — in marches, #MeToo protests and the ballot box.

Women Score Big in Key Primaries

In the United States, an African-American woman has never been elected governor. That may happen in 2018 if Stacey Abrams is elected in Georgia. Though she has a tough road, she passed the first hurdle Tuesday night when she was overwhelmingly chosen to be the Democrats’ nominee. In many states, in races for state and federal offices, women are stepping up. What are their chances in November? It’s unclear for now – but you can’t win if you’re not playing, and this election season, women are definitely in it.

Charlotte Talks Local News Roundup: Panthers Sale, NC Teachers Protest, City Budget Gets Review

The Panthers have a new owner. Lawmakers, back in Raleigh for the first day of the short session, confront teachers from across the state as well as another group of demonstrators in Raleigh asking lawmakers to address poverty. And, Charlotte residents weigh in on the proposed city budget and possible tax increase.

A panel of reporters joins Mike Collins to expand on those and other stories.