Voting rights, a partisan issue? Yes, Republicans have fallen that far

OPINION — Stacey Abrams has it right, for right now. She lost her 2018 race to be the governor of Georgia to Republican Brian Kemp, who as secretary of state was in charge of the election, a situation that would not pass the sniff test in North Korea.

OK, that comparison is a little far-fetched, but only a little.

Since then, though, she’s been plenty busy, confirming that, yes, she would be open to a vice presidential spot on the 2020 Democratic ticket and locking down a network TV deal for a drama based on one of her novels.

Most importantly, though, through her group Fair Fight, she has been fighting for voting rights, an issue that’s bigger than one election and always has been.

Despite the GOP talking point that the impeachment inquiry is crowding out important work, under Speaker Nancy Pelosi, the House has been passing legislation, only to see those bills die in the Senate under the strict command of Majority Leader Mitch McConnell.

Last week, another proposed bill joined the list, with little doubt that it too would meet the same Senate fate. The two parties can’t even agree on what to call it. For Democrats, and officially, it is the Voting Rights Advancement Act. Republicans have dubbed it the “The Federal Control of Elections Act.”

Not too subtle.

Mary C. Curtis: Articles of Impeachment Debate

CHARLOTTE, NC  — Now that house democrats have laid out impeachment charges against President Donald Trump– the debate officially begins.

Political contributor Mary C. Curtis discusses what’s next in the process.

POLITICAL WRAP: Lack of Diversity on Democratic Debate Stage?

CHARLOTTE, N.C. – Next week, the democratic candidates for president will meet again on the debate stage. But now the field is beginning to narrow. So far, only six candidates have qualified.

And with California Senator Kamala Harris dropping out of the race last week, some Democrats worry there will be a lack of diversity on the stage December 19th.

WCCB Charlotte Political Contributor Mary C. Curtis has more in this week’s political wrap.

Double standards for 2020 Democratic hopefuls? You don’t say

OPINION — There is a particular line that stuck with me in the just-opened film “Queen & Slim,” about a black couple on the run after an altercation with a white police officer goes awry in the depressing and terrible way you might imagine. During their perilous road trip, in a quieter moment, he (a retail worker) asks her (an attorney) if she is good at her job. “I’m an excellent lawyer,” she replies, to which he answers with a question that’s really a statement: “Why do black people always got to be excellent? Why can’t we just be ourselves?”

Since the pre-mortems were written a bit ago, it’s time for a post-mortem on the presidential campaign of California Sen. Kamala Harris, who never seemed to quite discover who she was or at least convey authenticity and excellence to enough voters or donors to make a difference.

Buttigieg Seeks Black Voter Support as Presidential Race Shifts

CHARLOTTE, N.C. — Though his support has surged in early caucus and primary states Iowa and New Hampshire, 2020 Democratic hopeful Pete Buttigieg has low polling numbers in states with a more diverse voting base. In South Carolina, he is polling in the very low single digits, which is a step up from his former number of 0%. Though he has funds and momentum, the South Bend, Indiana, mayor might hit a wall in a party that depends on a strong African-American and Hispanic voting base.

Minority voters — African-American women in particular — were key in recent elections that turned Virginia state government blue and re-elected a Democratic governor in Louisiana after President Trump campaigned for his opponent. Can Buttigieg solve this problem and save his chances to be the nominee?

And what does it say about the 2020 race on the Democratic side, which started out with such a diverse group, now that California Sen. Kamala Harris has dropped out and the slate for the December debate has narrowed to top candidates who do not reflect that party’s racial diversity. (Mary C. Curtis)

POLITICAL WRAP: Impeachment Hearings Move to Judiciary Committee

CHARLOTTE, N.C. – The White House now has until Friday to decide whether or not to participate in the next round of House Impeachment Hearings. The deadline comes just days before the first hearings with the House Judiciary Committee get under way. Press Secretary Stephanie Grisham responded to the invitation, saying the offer is being reviewed, but that the President has done nothing wrong.

Click above for more with WCCB Charlotte Political Contributor Mary C. Curtis.

Mary C. Curtis: Bloomberg, Impeachment

Michael Bloomberg says he knows what it takes to beat President Trump. Meanwhile, the House Judiciary Committee will hold its first impeachment hearing on December 4th. Political contributor Mary C. Curtis is covering it all.

POLITICAL WRAP: New Candidates Enter Democratic Presidential Primary

CHARLOTTE, N.C. – Two last minute presidential candidates are entering the race for the Democratic nomination. Micheal Bloomberg announced his bid on Sunday. The former New York City Mayor is facing criticism from Bernie Sanders and others who say he’s trying to buy his way into the race.

And earlier this month, former Massachusetts Governor Deval Patrick announced a run. But he hasn’t been able to gain much momentum. Last week, he was forced to cancel a campaign appearance, after only two people showed up.

WCCB Charlotte Political Contributor Mary C. Curtis has more in this week’s political wrap. Click above for the web video.

Charlotte Talks Local News Roundup: ASC Layoffs; I-77 Toll Lanes Open; Truist Coming In December

On this week’s Charlotte Talks Local News Roundup…

Impeachment proceedings in Washington may lead the national headlines this week, but Charlotte has still managed some headlines of its own, beginning with David Tepper and his candid comments after Sunday’s Panther loss at home to Atlanta and his thoughts on Charlotte’s bid for a Major League Soccer expansion.

The Arts & Science Council begins layoffs in the aftermath of the local elections earlier this month in which the proposed sales tax increase for arts, parks and education was defeated.

The I-77 toll lanes were fully opened over the weekend, but there’s still work to do on the project. Work is continuing and fines are still accumulating.

Clayton Wilcox is back in the news in a new report from the Charlotte Observer, where the former CMS Superintendent is said to have pushed a contract with a tech company and then asked that company for a job.

The $66 billion merger between BB&T and SunTrust banks was approved this week by the Federal Reserve and the FDIC, and the banks are set to finalize the creation of their new bank Truist coming up next month.

And some new zoning along the LYNX Blue Line was approved by City Council Monday night- will this be a positive move for affordable housing in Charlotte?

Those and other stories on the local news roundup.

Guests:

Annie Ma, education reporter for the Charlotte Observer

Mary C. Curtis, columnist for Rollcall.com and WCCB

Jonathan Lowe, anchor/ reporter for Spectrum News 

Joe BrunoWSOC-TV Reporter

Ann Doss HelmsWFAE Education Reporter

Bloomberg, Biden, Buttigieg and the bunch apologize. Should black voters listen, forgive and vote?

OPINION — Of course, Michael Bloomberg went there — there being a black church to ask for forgiveness. As he tentatively dips his toe and his billions into the Democratic presidential race, joining a scrum that expands even as it shrinks, Bloomberg, perhaps realizing that the path to the presidency must include the enthusiastic support of black and brown voters, has rethought his enthusiastic support of “stop and frisk.”

“I got something important really wrong,” he told the congregation at the Christian Cultural Center in Brooklyn on Sunday. “I didn’t understand back then the full impact that stops were having on the black and Latino communities.”

As New York City mayor, Bloomberg insisted that in order to fight crime, police must have the power to stop anyone judged a potential lawbreaker, which translated to ritualizing a practice that humiliated hundreds of thousands of black and brown New Yorkers who were detained, questioned and patted down because of “furtive movements” or some other vague justification. The number of stops rose to more than 685,000 in 2011, with no citations made or charges brought nearly 90 percent of the time.