Opinion: Saying ‘Not Trump’ Is Not Enough for GOP

When Donald Trump is the bad cop, everybody can be the good cop.

President Trump Blames Charlottesville Violence on ‘Both Sides’

NEW YORK (AP) – President Donald Trump is defiantly blaming “both sides” for the weekend violence between white supremacists and counter-demonstrators in Virginia and rebuffing the widespread criticism of his handling of the emotionally-charged protests.

Trump addressed reporters Tuesday in New York.

In his remarks, he showed sympathy for the fringe group’s efforts to preserve Confederate monuments.

In doing so, Trump used the bullhorn of the presidency to give voice to the grievances of white nationalists, and aired some of his own. His remarks amounted to a rejection of the Republicans, business leaders and White House advisers who earlier this week had pushed the president to more forcefully and specifically condemn the KKK members, neo-Nazis and white supremacists who took to the streets of Charlottesville.

Mary C. Curtis, political contributor, weighs in.

Charlotte Talks Friday News Roundup: PGA Championship in Charlotte; Citizens Review Board

This week on the Friday News Roundup…

The PGA has been here all week– officials have praised Quail Hollow and the red carpet treatment Charlotte has given the Championship. Despite the rain, we’re rumored to be getting good grades from PGA leadership as a host city.

This week, the Citizens Review Board looked in on CMPD’s internal exoneration of the officer who shot Keith Lamont Scott nearly a year ago, spending days of testimony behind closed doors.

The budget has been approved for CMS with teacher and principal salary raises topping the list of highlights. What did and didn’t make it into this year’s plan?

Governor Cooper was in town this week to announce the expansion of Allstate Insurance Company to Charlotte, which will bring 2250 jobs to the Queen City.

Mike Collins and our panel of Roundup Reporters fill us in on those stories and the rest of the week’s top local stories.

Guests:

Tom Bullock, WFAE Reporter.

Katie Peralta, Reporter for The Charlotte Observer.

Erik Spanberg, senior staff writer at the Charlotte Business Journal.

Mary C.Curtis, columnist at Roll Call and a contributor to other publications including WCCB News Rising and NBCBLK.

Opinion: Will Move to Purge Ohio Voting Rolls Kickstart Congressional Action?

Fifty-two years ago this week, John Lewis of Georgia was a young activist, not the Democratic congressman he is today. Yet he got a warmer welcome from the then-president of the United States, Lyndon B. Johnson, than from today’s occupant of the White House.

On the Twitter feed of the longtime member of the U.S. House of Representatives, you can see a picture celebrating that time a few decades ago, when, with Democratic and Republican support, the Voting Rights Act of 1965 was passed and then signed.

Lewis was one of those who suffered arrests and shed blood to make it so. You might think that at 77 years of age, he has earned the right to relax just a little. But instead of celebrating progress made, he has to ignore occasional insults from President Donald Trump and some of his congressional colleagues, while refighting a version of that same fight for voting rights.

Every day there is that reminder, whether it is a Presidential Advisory Commission on Election Integrity, stacked with a rogue’s gallery of folks with a history of searching for nonexistent hordes of fraudulent voters, or news that Trump’s Justice Department has joined Ohio’s campaign to purge its voter rolls.

How many in Congress will stand with their colleague and other leaders to strengthen rather than dilute the power of that defining law from 52 years ago? How many will stand with a president who asked minority communities to support him — “what do you have to lose” was both question and challenge — with a grab bag of policies that illustrates exactly what his statements meant?

Citizens Review Board Hears Keith Scott Case

CHARLOTTE, NC — The Charlotte Citizens Review Board (CRB) is holding closed hearings this week to take another look at the evidence and circumstance surrounding last year’s fatal police shooting of Keith Lamont Scott.

The board will decide if the Charlotte-Mecklenburg Police Department was wrong when it decided Officer Brentley Vinson followed the department use of force policy when he killed Scott. The District Attorney determined that the shooting was justified

Scott’s death sparked protests and violent riots across Charlotte.

There has been calls for decades for the CRB to have more power. They can make recommendations to adjust police training, policy and procedures, but cannot reverse the decision by Chief Kerr Putney and the DA not to charge Officer Vinson.

If the CRB decides the shooting isn’t justified, the Chief Putney and the City Manager will re-evaluate the case.

Is this the kind of case that could lead to the CRB getting more authority?

Political Contributor, Mary Curtis weighs in.

Opinion: Trump’s Ratings Hold Steady, but Is He Losing Key Groups He Needs to Stay on Top?

“You’re fired!” was the reality show refrain of the now president of the United States, Donald Trump. So when, on the campaign trail, candidate Trump said, “I alone can fix it,” with “it” meaning whatever was ailing the country and each one of its citizens, it was easy to for someone looking for answers to transfer his my-way-or-the-highway TV decisiveness to Oval Office success.

Could “The Apprentice” boss have bought into his own hype on the way to the White House, forgetting the behind-the-scenes writers and producers, and the reality of life after the director yells, “Cut”?

Tillerson: U.S. Proposes Sit-Down Talks with North Korea

(CNN) — Conflicting signals about the possibility of war between the U.S. and North Korea. Secretary of State Rex Tillerson said Tuesday that the U.S. is willing to sit down for talks with North Korea, but only if it relinquishes its pursuit of nuclear weapons. He says the goal of all U.S. foreign policy now is to make good on President Donald Trump’s campaign slogan to “make America great again.”

South Carolina Senator Lindsey Graham says military option is “inevitable” if Kim Jong Un continues developing missiles that are capable of reaching major U.S. cities.

This all comes after Pyongyang’s firing of two intercontinental ballistic missile tests in July. In response, the U.S. has just tested it’s fourth ICBM.

Political Contributor, Mary C. Curtis offers more perspective into the rising North Korea threat.

Get The Scoop: How To Break Into Journalism

If you have your sights set on breaking into journalism, you have many different possible entry points, but all have the same basic requirements. You need to be curious, ethical, passionate about accuracy and have a strong drive for good storytelling.

Those foundational credos apply to all platforms—text, digital, audio, video, visual, data, graphic as well as social media. The good news is there are more outlets domestically and internationally looking for journalists to create content remotely than ever before in history.

Opinion: ‘Values’ Are Relative When Rooting for Your Political Team

In his wary optimism after the U.S. Senate voted to proceed with debate on dismantling President Barack Obama’s signature Affordable Care Act and replacing it with, well, something, Majority Leader Mitch McConnell of Kentucky said he and his supporters were “not out here to spike the football.”

In this case, the cliched sports metaphor fit.

Politics, more than ever, has come to resemble a depressingly repetitive sporting event: Judging an idea’s worth depends on which team supports it. And the opposing team is — always the New England Patriots.

The Ongoing Health Care Battle

One step forward, but a long road ahead. That sums up what’s happening with the Senate health care debate. WCCB’s political contributor, Mary C. Curtis, weighs in.