The legacy of Ruth Bader Ginsburg

Mary C. Curtis, a Columnist at Roll Call, talked about the legacy of Ruth Bader Ginsburg and the fight to replace her on the U.S. Supreme Court.

 

POLITICAL WRAP: Battle Over Filling Supreme Court Opening

CHARLOTTE, N.C. – Battle lines are being drawn over the fight to fill the open seat on the Supreme Court. Our political contributor Mary C. Curtis takes a look at the possible scenarios over the weeks and months to come.

POLITICAL WRAP: Woodward Interview; Campaign Trail

CHARLOTTE, N.C. – Fallout continues after President Trump’s comments to Bob Woodward about downplaying the danger of the coronavirus.

But Woodward is facing criticism too, about holding the comments for a date closer to the election.

Our political contributor Mary C. Curtis has more on that in the video above, along with the latest as the campaigns turn their attention to the battleground states.

Where faith divides: How do voters define justice in 2020?

In a recent phone conversation — a catch-up during COVID isolation — a longtime friend talked of a memory that seemed especially relevant these days. A fellow cradle Catholic, whom I met at a Catholic university, she recalled how startled she was on entering my childhood parish for my decades-ago wedding and finding herself surrounded by statues of the saints and Christ on the cross, familiar to her but so very different. The faces and hands and pierced feet were painted black, so unlike anything she had experienced growing up.

It stopped her, until she realized how appropriate the scene was. Of course, these representations would be reimagined in the image of those who gathered and worshipped in this particular holy place, located in the heart of West Baltimore.

It opened her eyes and, at that moment, expanded her worldview. The incident was one among many that inched our friendship toward a richer, more fulfilling space, where we could see the world and its gifts, as well as its inequities, through one another’s eyes.

Mary C. Curtis: President Trump Visits Kenosha After Police Shooting of Jacob Blake

CHARLOTTENC – President Donald Trump makes a visit to KenoshaWisconsin amid protests following the police shooting of Jacob Blake.

WCCB political contributor Mary C. Curtis talks about the president’s call for law and order.

POLITICAL WRAP: Campaign Strategies Come into Focus

CHARLOTTE, N.C. – With the conventions behind us, the campaigns are starting to share their message for the final two months of the Presidential race.

President Trump is spending time on the campaign trail, focusing on battleground states.

Former Vice President Biden is promising to travel after Labor Day.

Our political contributor Mary C. Curtis has more in the video above.

The Heat: Donald Trump’s case for four more years

It was a long speech, lasting more than one hour.  US President Donald Trump promised to rebuild the economy, to develop a vaccine against the coronavirus and to end the protests around the country. But most of the time was devoted to attacking his Democratic rival.  After Trump’s speech, a fireworks display illuminated the night in Washington, closing out the Republican National Convention. The president is already in full campaign mode, hosting a rally in New Hampshire, Friday night. The election in the United States is scheduled for November 3rd.

Joining the panel:

Democrats offer virtual vision for an inclusive America. Your turn, Republicans

It turns out the crowds, the balloons and confetti were merely froufrou, just window dressing. Stripped down, it was even easier for the themes of this week’s Democratic National Convention — and the party’s vision for the future — to break through.

The Democrats’ unity on display could be a bit ripe for parody, for sure, a little like seeing Sylvester and Tweety Bird declaring a temporary truce before the inevitable chase continues. The scenes of comity — Republicans crossing over to extol the character of Joe Biden, progressives vowing to work with moderates — would most certainly be replaced by the usual infighting and struggles for policy influence even, or especially, if Democrats win big in November. That’s the Democratic and (small “d” democratic) way.

Sometimes a “big tent” gets awfully crowded, and messy. And with Democrats, the mess can sometimes overwhelm the message or, as in 2016 when Bernie Sanders’ supporters were still complaining loudly on the convention floor, consume it.

But that oft-used expression, that diversity is America’s strength, so often mocked as cliché, still has the ability to provoke a sentimental misty eye if offered with sincerity. And when a loud segment of America obviously rejects it, captured on way too many angry viral videos — well, that’s when it becomes more important to protect the promise.

“Uniting America” has been the message of the Democratic National Convention and the party’s campaign, virtual and otherwise, moving into the fall. Democrats are betting the country is exhausted and pushed to the brink by challenges that an entertainer in chief is ill-equipped to handle.

POLITICAL WRAP: DNC Preview; Mail-In Ballot Concerns

CHARLOTTE, N.C. – The virtual Democratic National Convention gets underway on Monday.

So what will the message be?

And how will Democrats keep the excitement up at a virtual event?

And the debate over the post office and mail-in voting.

Our political contributor Mary C. Curtis has more in the video above.

‘It’s just history’: Kamala Harris as the VP nominee

Kamala Harris made history, again, this week, when she became the first Black woman and first Asian American picked for a major political party’s presidential ticket. The daughter of an Indian mother and a Jamaican father, the California Democrat has been many firsts.

She has been a county deputy district attorney; the district attorney for San Francisco — the first woman and first African American elected to that position; and California’s first female, Black and Asian American attorney general. Harris was also the second Black woman to join the Senate, succeeding Democrat Barbara Boxer in 2017.

Not quite four years ago, it was Joe Biden, as vice president, who swore her in as California’s junior senator. Now Biden is counting on Harris to help him win the White House as his running mate.

With us on Political Theater to talk about this pick is CQ Roll Call columnist Mary C. Curtis, a longtime political correspondent covering the intersection of politics, culture and race.