Why politicians, and everyone, need to think about legacy

OPINION — At least the bill was approved on a voice vote. That was the bill that would make lynching a federal crime, passed in the Senate late last week — in 2019.

Let that sink in. The legislation still must be approved by the Democrat-controlled House, which is expected to happen with no problem, and be signed into law by President Donald Trump. But it would be unwise to take anything for granted since similar legislation has stalled for more than 100 years, held up by elected public servants who felt that taking a stand would be too politically risky.

A Kamala Harris candidacy is a test, and not just for the candidate

OPINION — Of course, a reporter asked Kamala Harris how she would describe her identity. The California senator, a new entry into a crowded and growing Democratic field to challenge Donald Trump next year, answered simply, “I describe myself as a proud American.”

It’s a question no other candidate has been asked, and one that Harris will no doubt be asked again before the long slog to November 2020 is completed.

It’s not just her competitors Harris will be confronting in the months until then (or until her campaign comes to an end). It’s also questions like that one, understandable in the coverage of her historic quest. But it’s the extra scrutiny that can be exhausting for anyone just trying to live as herself or himself while being seen as an “other” by so many.

Doug Jones Defeats Roy Moore in Alabama

CHARLOTTE, NC — In deep-red Alabama, Democrat Doug Jones pulled off an upset win over Republican Roy Moore to fill a U.S. Senate seat. With the national and international spotlight on the state, Alabama voted to break with its recent tradition – and go against the candidate heartily endorsed by President Trump in a state he handily won. (Mary C. Curtis)

Political Contributor, Mary C. Curtis weighs in on what happened and what this means.

Opinion: Remembering Recy Taylor and the Too Familiar State of Alabama

In “The Rape of Recy Taylor,” a recently released documentary, you see the face of bravery. It is Recy Taylor, the 24-year-old African-American — a wife and mother of an infant daughter — kidnapped in 1944 by a carful of young white men, some the sons of the “respectable” leaders of Abbeville, Alabama, where they all lived. A gun held to her head, she was blindfolded, driven to a remote spot and violated in unimaginable ways. She escaped being killed by promising to keep quiet.

But she did not keep that promise.

Taylor’s legacy can be seen in the women speaking up now about sexual harassment of all kinds, most recently Alabama women who on the surface have little in common with a poor black sharecropper from decades ago. In fact, Beverly Young Nelson, who became the fifth woman to accuse Roy Moore when she tearfully recounted her story of an alleged sexual assault, said she and her husband voted for Donald Trump, while Taylor, in her midcentury time, was not allowed to vote at all.

The Ongoing Health Care Battle

One step forward, but a long road ahead. That sums up what’s happening with the Senate health care debate. WCCB’s political contributor, Mary C. Curtis, weighs in.

Senate GOP Health Care Bill. What’s Next?

CHARLOTTE, NC — The Republican Party’s long-promised repeal of ‘Obamacare’ is on the brink after Senate Majority Leader, Mitch McConnell, short of GOP support, delayed votes planned for this week.

President Trump is working with Republican senators to push their health care bill over the finish line. Mr. Trump is urging lawmakers to reach an agreement after the July 4th recess.

With no Democratic support, there are only two votes to spare. At least nine Republicans oppose the bill in its current form.

Political Contributor , Mary C. Curtis offers more perspective on the delayed health care vote, problems with the proposed bill, and a potential compromise.

Will Donald Trump’s Supreme Court pick, Neil Gorsuch, run into Senate roadblocks?

CHARLOTTE, NC —  The White House is paving the way for Constitutional Conservative Neil Gorsuch to fill the open spot on the nation’s highest court. Right now, it doesn’t seem like Democrats will put up much of a fight over his Supreme Court nomination. WCCB Political Contributor Mary C. Curtis weighs in.

The State of North Carolina after Midterms

CHARLOTTE, NC- It’s been one week since mid term elections wrapped up, but where does North Carolina stand now. Is the state red, blue or somewhere in the middle? Political Contributor Mary Curtis says even though the state voted Republican, it’s not necessarily red. Recent races have shown small margins of victory, pointing to problems like voter turnout. For Democrats to be successful in the future, she says the party needs to work on getting more voters to the polls, have a good slate of candidates and sell their message.

Election Day Preview in North Carolina


CHARLOTTE, NC- Political Contributor Mary Curtis provides insight into today’s election and why it’s one that controls the outcome of power in the U.S. Senate. The race between Incumbent Senator Kay Hagan and Speaker of the House Thom Tillis is the most expensive ever costing over $100 million. NC poll are open until 7:30pm and SC polls are open until 7pm.

Are Democratic candidates who steer clear of Obama pushing away black voters?

The third in a list of five myths about black voters by The Washington Post’s Nia-Malika Henderson is: Candidates who distance themselves from President Obama risk losing black voters. That may be a myth, because African Americans in the United States lived with compromise before they could even vote, much less vote for a black candidate for the top office in the country. But in this year’s midterm election, the loyal-for-the-most-part Democrats may mark their ballots with weary resignation and some dissatisfaction.