Black History Month Profile: Chatty Hattie

CHARLOTTE, N.C. — When radio ruled the airwaves “Chatty Hattie” Leeper became a prominent voice in Charlotte.

She broke ground as the first black announcer in North Carolina in the 1950s.

When Hattie Leeper was a young girl wondering, ‘How did they get inside that radio,’ as she listened to WGIV, 1600 on the dial, could she have imagined where her dreams would lead?

WCCB Charlotte contributor Mary C. Curtis shows us how Chatty Hattie is making a mark on Charlotte to this day.

Local News Roundup: CMS Prepares For In-Person Class; Transit Plan Gets Movement; New Names For Charlotte Streets

City Council okays a recommendation to rename Charlotte streets with white supremacist ties, but what those new names might be is up in the air. We’ll talk about the council discussion.

Charlotte’s transit plan will need some tweaks if City Council wants to get the regional support it’s hoping for. We’ll update you about what’s being said in council and in northern Mecklenburg County.

This week, Gov. Roy Cooper signed a COVID-19 relief bill — the first of 2021. The bill is designed to help schools reopen, extend a deadline for parents coping with remote learning and fund vaccine distribution. We’ll discuss.

And Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools students return to the classroom. The youngest students begin in-person learning on Monday, keeping the plan that was approved in February. We’ll talk about what this will mean for each age group as well as continued concerns for risk to teachers and students.

Mike Collins and our roundtable of reporters delve into the week’s top news on the Charlotte Talks local news roundup.

Guests:

Erik Spanberg, managing editor for the Charlotte Business Journal

Mary C. Curtis, columnist for Rollcall.com, host of the Rollcall podcast “Equal Time” and contributor at WCCB-TV

Claire Donnelly, WFAE health reporter

Hunter Saenz, reporter for WCNC

Local News Roundup: Insurrection At Capitol, The Coronavirus Surges As Vaccine Rolls Out, Transit Proposal Moves Along

On the Local News Roundup, protesters angered by what they perceive to be a “stolen election,” engage in an act of insurrection, storming the Capitol in Washington. Four people die. The president continues to spread the lies that led to that event and some Republicans begin to distance themselves while others persist in cynical opportunism.

The rate of the coronavirus infection continues to rise to alarming levels. As a result, Gov. Roy Cooper extends Stage 3 restrictions in North Carolina.

And Charlotte City Council takes up the one-cent sales tax for transit.

Our roundtable of reporters fills us in.

Guests

David Boraks, reporter for WFAE (@davidboraks)

Claire Donnelly, health reporter for WFAE (@donnellyclairee)

Joe Bruno, reporter for WSOC-TV (@JoeBrunoWSOC9)

Nick Ochsner, executive producer for investigations & chief investigative reporter for WBTV (@NickOchsnerWBTV)

Mary C. Curtis, columnist for Rollcall.com, host of the Rollcall podcast “Equal Time” and contributor at WCCB-TV (@mcurtisnc3)

Black Issues Forum: Looking Ahead to 2021

As the Electoral College formalizes the election of President-Elect Joe Biden and COVID-19 vaccines begin to rollout in NC and across the country, can we expect a turning point after what’s been a contentious year? We also discuss the growing trend of reparations in North Carolina with journalist Mary C. Curtis, Morrisville Town Councilman Steve Rao, and NCCU professor Brett Chambers.

Mary C. Curtis: COVID-19 Vaccinations Underway

CHARLOTTE. NC — The first COVID-19 vaccines, from Pfizer and approved by the FDA for emergency use, have been sent throughout the country, including North Carolina, where health care workers and residents of care facilities are tops of the list to receive the shot. A Moderna vaccine might get approval later this week. This is happening as the country passes 300,000 dead from the virus, with hospitalizations reaching record highs in North Carolina.

WCCB political contributor Mary C. Curtis has more.

Local News Roundup: COVID-19 Cases Continue To Surge With Vaccines On The Way; A New Curfew; CMS Returns To Remote Learning

Friday, Dec. 11, 2020

On the next Charlotte Talks local news roundup …

Gov. Roy Cooper imposes a statewide curfew of 10 p.m. beginning Friday as numbers for COVID-19 spike, and in Mecklenburg County, trends reach new highs. We’ll give a local and regional update on the coronavirus and what the new curfew means for businesses.

Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools opts to go back to remote learning until January in an effort to limit the spread of COVID-19 in the area. We’ll talk about the school board vote and what it will mean for all students, especially those about to take exams.

The Department of Health and Human Services has released the list of hospital systems that will receive the first shipment of a coronavirus vaccine. The state expects about 85,000 vaccine doses from Pfizer, which are going first to health care workers and residents in adult care facilities.

And Charlotte Moves recommended last week that the city put a 1-cent sales tax hike on the ballot for next year’s election. The tax would fund several transportation projects in Mecklenburg County. But for that to happen, legislators in North Carolina would need to authorize the increase and approve a referendum. We’ll hear what some of those legislators say about the proposal and its chances.

Those stories and more as Mike Collins and our roundtable of reporters delve into this week’s top news on the Charlotte Talks local news roundup.

GUESTS:

Erik Spanberg, managing editor for the Charlotte Business Journal

Mary C. Curtis, columnist for Rollcall.com, host of the Rollcall podcast “Equal Time” and contributor at WCCB-TV

Steve Harrison, WFAE political reporter

Annie Ma, education reporter for the Charlotte Observer

Mary C. Curtis: Trump Signs Order on COVID-19 Vaccine

CHARLOTTE, NC — COVID-19 vaccines will be given to Americans just as soon as the FDA approves emergency use authorization.

President Trump signed an executive order Tuesday, which will prioritize the U.S. receiving doses over other countries.

This move comes after a New York Times piece claimed Pfizer offered to sell more doses to the U.S. over the summer, but the Trump Administration turned it down.

Political contributor Mary C. Curtis has more.

Black Issues Forum: Election 2020: What Comes Next?

Election Day has come and gone, but Black communities in North Carolina could potentially feel the aftereffects for years to come. This week, Black Issues Forum is peeling back the layers on North Carolina’s biggest political races and breaking down what they could mean for African Americans in our state.

Local News Roundup: Post-Election Edition

On the next Charlotte Talks local news roundup …

The election night that we’ve been gearing up for over the last four years arrived this week … and lingered. We’ll talk about the big local and state races as well as where local voters showed up for presidential candidates — and where possible, we’ll provide results.

There was no widespread violence in North Carolina on Election Day, but an arrest in the University City-area precinct, a march in Alamance that ended in a pepper spray incident the weekend prior to the election and an overnight march in Raleigh on election night could be the first in demonstrations about results here and around the country.

Charlotte’s three bond referendums took easy victories in the election this week, approving spending of over $197 million for transportation, affordable housing and neighborhood improvements. We’ll talk about exactly where that money will go.

Those stories and an update on COVID-19 in North Carolina as Mike Collins and our roundtable of reporters delve into this week’s top stories on the Charlotte Talks local news roundup.

In North Carolina, red and blue don’t make purple

North Carolina is a political player, a battleground state visited and fought over by national candidates in both parties. And Charlotte has had challenges that mirror those of many big American cities: protests and debates over police reform and frustrations that all citizens don’t share in its economic growth and opportunity. Mary C. Curtis speaks to Charlotte Mayor Vi Lyles about the election and what comes next.