2018 Midterm Takeaways

CHARLOTTE. NC —  North Carolina may not have had a senator or governor’s race on the ballot, but there was no shortage of drama in contests that determined GOP super-majorities in the state legislature, controversial amendments to the state constitution, Charlotte bond issues and judicial races. Several U.S. Congressional contests in North Carolina also drew national attention. (Mary Curtis)

WCCB political contributor, Mary C. Curtis offers more context on key local and national takeaways from the 2018 midterm elections.

The Devil on Trump’s Shoulder and in the Country’s Ear

OPINION — CHARLOTTE, N.C. — It’s a setup in many cartoons and films of days past: The protagonist is presented with a moral dilemma, and gets conflicting advice from a devil perched on one shoulder and an angel on the other. The behavior of Donald Trump in a presidency filled with choices reminds me of those scenes, though his angel must be downright depressed by now.

The latest appeal to the president’s “better angels” worked for a little while as he reacted to the massacre at a Pittsburgh synagogue, the apparently race-based fatal shootings of two black shoppers in Kentucky and a series of bombs sent to people on his enemies list.

Then the devil’s horns peeked through, culminating in a promise this week to rescind birthright citizenship by executive order, a move most legal experts judge unconstitutional, though it wrestles headlines away from the horrific events of the past week and back onto the divisive immigration issue Trump judges a political winner.

How Will Charlotte Stay Above the Partisan Fray for RNC 2020?

CHARLOTTE, NC — Charlotte was out in front, and almost alone, in vying to host the 2020 Republican National Convention, set – for now – to nominate President Trump for a second term. The city won, and now we have more details.

Republican National Committee Chairwoman Ronna McDaniel made the announcement at the Charlotte Convention Center this week alongside Mayor Vi Lyles and White House Senior Advisor (and presidential daughter-in-law and North Carolina native) Lara Trump: The convention will take place at the Spectrum Center in uptown Charlotte from August 24, 2020 through August 27, 2020.

So, as planning seriously starts, how will the Queen City pull it off, peacefully and professionally?

Trump to the Rescue (Maybe) in North Carolina

OPINION — When Donald Trump travels to North Carolina this week, it won’t be for one of the campaign-style rallies that are his oxygen — especially needed now when the air is filled with praise for his nemesis John McCain, who is being lauded in death in terms the president can only dream about.

This Friday in Charlotte, host of the 2020 GOP convention and with the Trump National Golf Club not that far away in Mooresville, the president is scheduled to make a lunchtime appearance at a country club for an audience of those willing and able to pay at least $1,000 ($25,000 will get you admission to a “roundtable” and a photograph with Trump). It is a party with a purpose: to raise enough cash to keep two possibly vulnerable House seats in Republicans hands.

Charlotte Talks News Roundup: Divided City Council Backs RNC, Local Reaction To Trump/Putin Meeting

The Charlotte City Council voted in favor of the bid for the 2020 Republican National Convention, but the narrow 6-5 vote came after strong comments by council members and citizens. We go through the debates, the vote and where our bid stands.

President Trump’s failure to back U.S. intelligence agencies during his press conference with Vladimir Putin in Helsinki drew criticism from lawmakers on both sides of the aisle. We’ll talk through what our local lawmakers had to say.

One week after the CIAA announced that it’d be opening up its search for a tournament host city beginning in 2021 rather than staying in Charlotte, several cities have shown interest in hosting the tournament. We’ll talk about who has thrown their hat in the ring.

And CATS has revealed plans for new transit options, including an uptown tunnel.

GUESTS

David Boraks, WFAE reporter (@davidboraks)

Mary C. Curtis, Roll Call columnist (@mcurtisnc3)

Ann Doss Helms, The Charlotte Observer education reporter (@anndosshelms)

Erik Spanberg, Charlotte Business Journal  senior staff writer (@CBJSpanberg)

 

Opinion: Charlotte Gambles on the Convention Las Vegas Didn’t Want

CHARLOTTE, N.C. — Vi Lyles, the Democratic mayor of the largest city in North Carolina, said championing a bid to host the 2020 Republican National Convention was likely “the most difficult decision of my career.”

As word spread this week that Republicans have chosen Charlotte over other candidates, with a formal announcement due Friday, it’s almost certain the event will be one of the city’s biggest tests.

Public Hearing Ends In 6-5 Vote to Accept Contracts for 2020 RNC

“It’s not a convention like any other because Donald Trump is not a president like any other,” says WCCB Charlotte Political Contributor Mary C. Curtis.

A Citizenship Question on the 2020 Census: Why Is That a Big Deal?

It was announced this week by the Commerce Department that the 2020 Census would be changed to add a question about citizenship.
Already the state of California has sued, saying the question violates the Constitution; the New York Attorney General has said he will lead a multi-state lawsuit to preserve what he said was a fair and accurate Census.

Why does it matter, and what will it mean for North Carolina — and the country — economically and politically?

 

 

Charlotte Talks News Roundup: Facebook Data, School Safety, CMS Segregation

The Facebook data scandal finds its way to North Carolina. Republican senator Thom Tillis used the company at the center of the uproar, Cambridge Analytica, to target voters, as did the state Republican Party.

Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools Superintendent Clayton Wilcox offers a glimpse at post-Parkland security measures, as state lawmakers begin examining school safety.

A new report labels CMS the most racially-segregated school system in North Carolina, and says income-based segregation in the district is up sharply.

Mike Collins leads a discussion on the week’s news with our reporters roundtable.

GUESTS

David Boraks, reporter, WFAE

Glenn Burkins, editor and publisher, Q City Metro

Mary C. Curtis, columnist, Roll Call (@mcurtisnc3)

Ann Doss Helms, education reporter, The Charlotte Observer 

What North Carolina Schools are Doing to Protect Students

CHARLOTTE, NC– Another day, and unfortunately, another school shooting, this time in St. Mary’s County, Maryland. The circumstances change, but the tragedies continue. In Wake County this week, three schools were put on lockdown after threats. And a UNCC student was arrested for making threats.

And all this is before the March 24 “March for Our Lives,” scheduled in WashingtonDC., to rally for gun control and school safety measures, and organized in spirit and action by students in Parkland, Fla., after a shooting at their high school killed 17 last month.

Other marches will be happening across the country and around the world.

So, what are North Carolina schools doing? Are they taking cues from actions in other states?