Opinion: In a Culture War, American Values Lose

Over the weekend, a group of white nationalists returned to Charlottesville, Virginia, faces proudly uncovered and tiki torches in hand, with a message of division.

White supremacist leader Richard Spencer said to applause, “You are going to have to get used to white identity” — and warned of more to come.

The story barely lasted one news cycle, perhaps because, this time, no one drove a car into a crowd of anti-hate counterprotesters and killed a woman.

What you have heard plenty about, the story that has made ripples and had serious repercussions, is Vice President Mike Pence’s staged walkout at a Colts-49ers NFL game in Indianapolis — a political stunt that cost the taxpayers plenty — because he disrespected several players’ support of equality, justice and police accountability.

And no matter the spin, that’s what the pregame protests have been about since former San Francisco quarterback Colin Kaepernick consulted with military veteran Nate Boyer and decided to kneel silently (instead of sit) during the playing of the national anthem.

Charlotte Marks One-Year Anniversary of Keith Scott Shooting

CHARLOTTE, NC — Charlotte is marking the one year anniversary of the deadly police shooting of Keith Lamont Scott and the days of unrest that followed. Hundreds of people stormed the streets of uptown in protest after CMPD Officer Brentley Vinsonshot and killed Scott, September 20th, 2016.

Scott’s death has since sparked concerns about race, equality, and opportunity in the Queen City as well as CMPD’s lack of transparency with the community. The situation also sent Charlotte into what many believe was long overdue conversation about race and social mobility in the city.

Political Contributor, Mary C. Curtis talks about the challenges Charlotte still faces a year later, what needs to be done in order to heal, and what community-police relations look like in Charlotte today.

Opinion: It’s Huge — Few Presidents Have Praised Authoritarians as Much as Trump

So what does a criminal look like, exactly? On the campaign trail, Donald Trump featured the moving stories of the grieving relatives of those who had been killed by criminals who were in the U.S. illegally. In a promise kept, the Department of Homeland Security has introduced the Victims of Immigration Crime Engagement Office, or VOICE, housed within Immigration and Customs Enforcement. DHS Secretary John Kelly said: “They are casualties of crimes that should never have taken place — because the people who victimized them often times should never have been in the country.”

Devaluation of black lives infects America to its core

It wasn’t really a surprise. Mecklenburg County District Attorney Andrew Murray laid out a careful case for why his office, following an investigation by the State Bureau of Investigation, decided not to charge Charlotte-Mecklenburg police officer Brentley Vinson in the shooting death of 43-year-old Keith Lamont Scott, who is African-American. Murray said he found no legal wrongdoing. Scott had a gun, Murray said the evidence showed that Scott didn’t drop it when officers shouted at him to do just that, and Vinson said he felt he had no choice, that he and his “buddies” were threatened.

No charges in Keith Scott shooting in Charlotte

CHARLOTTE, NC –We’ll learned today that the Mecklenburg County district attorney will not charge Brent Vinson, the CMPD officer who shot and killed Keith Scott back in September. Scott’s death sparked peaceful protests and riots here in Charlotte and across the country. The DA  announced his decision after meeting with the Scott family Wednesday morning. WCCB Political Contributor Mary C. Curtis weighs in.

The Ongoing Civil Unrest in Charlotte


CHARLOTTE, N.C. – Charlotte continues to  make national headlines due to the continuing civil unrest in Charlotte following the CMPD involved shooting death of Keith Scott. WCCB News Rising political contributor Mary C. Curtis joined Derek, Kristine and Terrance to discuss the ongoing issues that continue to cause the unrest for Charlotte and its residents.

Growing Inequality in Charlotte, N.C.

Charlotte residents have witnessed a second night of violence in the wake of a police shooting of a black man. Reporter Mary C. Curtis tells host Jeb Sharp that although Charlotte’s economy has been booming in recent years, not all sectors of society there have benefited from the growth.

Charlotte, N.C., Police Shooting Echoes 2013 Death Of Jonathan Ferrell

NPR’s Kelly McEvers speaks with Roll Call columnist and Charlotte, N.C., resident Mary C. Curtis about the 2013 police shooting of Jonathan Ferrell, and how it has since affected the community.

PHOTOS: Pain, Anger And Violence Fill Streets Of Charlotte, N.C.

Signs, rocks, tear gas, fireworks, broken glass, blood: The streets of Charlotte, N.C., have borne witness to days of unrest after a fatal police shooting on Tuesday.

Two nights of protests have included peaceful calls for unity as well as violence and destruction. On Wednesday night, a civilian was shot at a protest and now, city officials say, is on life support.

Clashes in Charlotte after police-involved shooting

Beverley O’Connor speaks to political commentator Mary C. Curtis about the unrest in Charlotte following the fatal police shooting of a black man.