The Heat: US President Trump Impeached

For only the third time in American history, a president of the United States has been impeached by the U.S. House of Representatives. The partisan vote, with no Republicans voting to impeach President Trump, now sets up a trial in the U.S. Senate that will determine if he can remain in office. Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi made the case on Wednesday, calling the president’s actions reckless.

But Republicans in Congress have denounced the Democrats impeachment action saying there was no merit to the two charges —abuse of power and obstruction of Congress.

To discuss all of this: Leonard Steinhorn is a political analyst and professor of Communication and History at American University. Nate Lerner heads “Build the Wave,” a progressive grassroots political organization. Frank Buckley is Foundation Professor at George Mason University’s Scalia School of Law. Mary C. Curtis is a columnist for Roll Call and an NPR contributor.

POLITICAL WRAP: Voter ID; Pelosi Delay; Charlotte Homicides

CHARLOTTE, N.C. – It appears North Carolina voters will not have to show ID in March’s presidential primary. A Federal Court temporarily blocked new requirements set to go into effect next year. The decision can be appealed but that would be up to Democrat state Attorney General Josh Stein.

U.S. Senators return to Washington at the end of the week. But the question remains, how longer will Nancy Pelosi wait to deliver the articles of impeachment? Senate leaders remain at an impasse over whether there will be new witnesses and testimony in a Senate trial.

Closer to home, this year’s homicide rate in Charlotte is on track to be the worst since 1993. CMPD has investigated 108 murders so far. Mayor Vi Lyles says Charlotte is looking at data from other cities for ways to curb the violence.

POLITICAL WRAP: Impeachment Process On Hold For Holiday Break, McCrory Eyeing Senate Run

CHARLOTTE, N.C. — The impeachment process for President Trump is on hold for at least now during the holiday break.  But, staff for the key house committees are expected to work over the holiday recess and could be prepping for a trial as early as the week of January 6th.

Former Governor Pat McCrory announced Thursday he won’t be running for his old job.  But, he says he will consider a U.S. Senate bid for 2022.

WCCB Charlotte Political Contributor Mary C. Curtis weighs in on those stories and more during this week’s Political Wrap.

POLITICAL WRAP: Impeachment Trial; Voter Rights; UK Election

CHARLOTTE, N.C. – After this week’s impeachment vote, debate will continue over a possible Senate trial. Majority leader Mitch McConnell says he’d like it to go quickly. But President Trump has talked about calling witnesses, ranging from Hunter Biden, to the whistleblower, to Congressman Adam Schiff.

Also, this week voting rights are back in the spotlight after a ruling by a circuit court judge in Wisconsin. 234,000 voters, flagged as having possibly moved, will be taken off the registry. The ruling is expected to hurt Democrats in a state President Trump won in 2016.

And in the UK, a landslide victory for Prime Minister Boris Johnson and the Conservative Party. Johnson is promising to “Get Brexit Done,” while President Trump calls the election result a possible “harbinger of what’s to come” in the 202o U.S. election.

Mary C. Curtis: Articles of Impeachment Debate

CHARLOTTE, NC  — Now that house democrats have laid out impeachment charges against President Donald Trump– the debate officially begins.

Political contributor Mary C. Curtis discusses what’s next in the process.

POLITICAL WRAP: Impeachment Hearings Move to Judiciary Committee

CHARLOTTE, N.C. – The White House now has until Friday to decide whether or not to participate in the next round of House Impeachment Hearings. The deadline comes just days before the first hearings with the House Judiciary Committee get under way. Press Secretary Stephanie Grisham responded to the invitation, saying the offer is being reviewed, but that the President has done nothing wrong.

Click above for more with WCCB Charlotte Political Contributor Mary C. Curtis.

Impeachment Hearings Week 2

CHARLOTTE, NC — Key witnesses and EU ambassador Gordon Sondland give testimony in the impeachment inquiry. Political contributor Mary C. Curtis discusses the biggest takeaways from week 2 of testimony.

In her congressional goodbye, Katie Hill worried about letting down young girls. Now that’s a change

OPINION — Katie Hill said, “I’m sorry,” a lot. In a speech that was not quite seven and a half minutes long, that stood out.

With a public impeachment inquiry now underway and a torrent of names and made-for-TV characters moving in and out of the spotlight, few remember that one of the votes approving this step was the last cast by Hill. The freshman congresswoman resigned her seat as she was about to face an ethics investigation after accusations that she was having a sexual relationship with a congressional aide. She denied that, though she admitted to one with a campaign staffer that she said was inappropriate though not rule-breaking.

What to Expect From House Impeachment Inquiry

CHARLOTTE, NC — Public hearings begin Wednesday in the house impeachment inquiry. Political contributor Mary C. Curtis breaks down what to expect and what’s at stake.

POLITICAL WRAP: Public Hearings in Impeachment Inquiry Begin This Week

CHARLOTTE, N.C. – Public hearings in the impeachment inquiry into President Donald Trump will begin on Wednesday. The televised hearings will feature public testimony from three key witnesses. U.S. diplomat Bill Taylor and State Department Official George Kent will appear on Wednesday. Former U.S. Ambassador to Ukraine Marie Yovanovitch is set to testify on Friday.

Republicans have submitted their requested list of witnesses for the hearings, saying they want to hear from the whistleblower, something Democrats are rejecting.

Click above for more in this week’s political wrap with WCCB Charlotte Political Contributor Mary C. Curtis.