Supreme Court examines voting districts

CHARLOTTE, NC — States must draw new election maps every 10 years. Dozens of North Carolina legislative maps were thrown out over illegal gerrymandering because judges said they violated the rights of black voters. Federal judges will consider new maps October 12th. The Supreme Court on Tuesday questioned lawyers in a similar redistricting case in Wisconsin.

What happened Tuesday at the court?

Will Supreme Court Redistricting Case Change Elections – and North Carolina?

Can redistricting ever be fair?

Is nonpartisan redistricting possible?

Roll Call Columnists on SCOTUS Abortion, McDonnell Decisions

Every presidential election, one side or other has tried, mostly in vain, to make appointments to the Supreme Court a major issue. With the present court’s rulings on controversial issues announced to a divided country — to reactions of shock and celebration, depending on which side you’re on — 2016 may be different.

The Supreme Court’s post-racial fantasy

That was then, this is now. The reasoning behind the Supreme Court’s ruling this week striking down key parts of the Voting Rights Act uses considerably more words, but that simple phrase pretty much says it all. To accept that conclusion, though, one has to accept that America is as post-racial as some have insisted since the election of President Obama.

A ‘military spouse of the year’ closely watches the Supreme Court

This week, Ashley Broadway is paying close attention to the Supreme Court as it hears two cases on the politically charged issue of same-sex marriage. For her, it’s about family: her spouse, Army Lt. Col. Heather Mack, their son, two weeks’ shy of 3 years, and two-month-old daughter.

“Regardless of how someone feels about same-sex marriage or their religious convictions, we can’t have second-class citizens, especially people defending our country and our constitution,” she said.

Kamala Harris: Focused on Job, Not SCOTUS

From advocating for health care reform to helping broker a settlement in the foreclosure crisis, California attorney general Kamala Harris has been as out-front on issues as she has in her vocal backing of Barack Obama. “I’ve been supporting the president for a long time; he’s been supporting me for a long time.”

A pioneer in her current position as well as in her previous post as district attorney of San Francisco, the Howard University graduate is the daughter of an Asian-Indian mother, a breast cancer specialist, and a Jamaican-American father, a Stanford economics professor. Harris said she grew up “surrounded by a bunch of adults who spent full time marching and shouting about this thing called justice.”

Harris spoke with The Root about issues, from prison reform to marriage equality.