If corporations are people, they just might have an opinion

That Pepsi bottle on the counter looks so out of place. My husband has always been a Diet Coke man. It’s a matter of principle, he tells me, even as he admits he prefers “The Real Thing.” Coca-Cola’s statement disapproving of Georgia’s new voting restrictions was too little, too late, and that’s that, he says. All of that puts the Atlanta-based soft drink giant in a bind, since even its belated critical stand was too much for backers of the bill, who are also banishing Coke from their own fridges, they say.

What’s a company to do?

I can’t feel too sorry for Coca-Cola, Delta and the rest, though, since they’ve been playing the political game forever while pretending to be above it all. And I have to stifle a laugh at the Republican politicians who are admonishing corporations and sports leagues now that the bills the GOP instigated aren’t getting a pass. These are the same pols who eagerly accepted campaign donations and good PR in days past.

Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell is astute enough to recognize why his furrowed brow and outraged words are landing with a thud. It’s why his story is constantly changing. He told companies to stay out of politics, was called on it, then said he meant to only offer advice that business leaders read the fine print before opening their mouths and closing their pocketbooks.

Congress Debates Ways To Protect U.S. Capitol, MLB Takes A Stand On Georgia’s New Voting Law

WASHINGTON, D.C. — Members of Congress debate how to protect the U.S. Capitol and the people who guard it.  This comes as a memorial grows for Capitol Police Officer Billy Evans who was killed Friday.

And, Major League Baseball announced this season’s All-Star Game and Draft will not be held in Atlanta.  The move is in response to the recently passed election law in Georgia that critics say would make it harder for minorities to vote.

WCCB Charlotte’s Political Contributor Mary C. Curtis weighs in.

Mary C. Curtis: Calls to Boycott Georgia Over New Voting Law

CHARLOTTE, NC — Growing calls from sports and businesses to boycott Georgia over the state’s new voting law.

Justice groups are urging sports organizations, like the PGA tour and major league baseball, to reconsider holding upcoming major events in the state.

Delta airlines and Coca-Cola, two of Atlanta’s biggest brands, are also facing boycott threats.

WCCB Political Contributor Mary C. Curtis discusses will the effort work.

You can catch Mary C. Curtis on Sunday nights at 6:30 PM on WCCB Charlotte’s CW discussing the biggest issues in local and national politics and also giving us a look at what’s ahead for the week.

You can also check out Mary’s podcast ‘Equal Time.’

POLITICAL WRAP: Election Integrity or Voter Suppression? Voting Laws in Spotlight

CHARLOTTE, N.C. – Election integrity or voter suppression?

Controversy is growing over the new Georgia election law.

Republicans are also pushing back on legislation that could add federal mandates on how elections are run.

Our political contributor Mary C. Curtis gives us her take in the video above.

Mary C. Curtis: Georgia Senate Runoff Races

CHARLOTTE, NC — Democrat Raphael Warnock is set become the first Black U.S. senator from Georgia. Warnock defeated incumbent Republican Kelly Loeffler in Tuesday’s runoff elections. The other runoff race between Republican David Perdue and Democratic challenger John Ossoff is still too close to call. The party that wins the race between Ossoff and Perdue will take control of the senate.

WCCB political contributor Mary C. Curtis has more on the high-stakes race.

You can catch Mary C. Curtis on Sunday nights at 6:30 PM on WCCB Charlotte’s CW discussing the biggest issues in local and national politics and also giving us a look at what’s ahead for the week.

You can also check out Mary’s podcast ‘Equal Time.’

 

President Trump and The Georgia Phone Call

President Trump is again insisting he won Georgia and says he wants to find the votes that proves he did.   The President pressing that issue during a phone call with Georgia Secretary of State Brad Raffensperger and legal staff. We examine the call and some the other issues for a critical political week in America that includes a Georgia U.S. Senate runoff election that will determine political power in the senate and the certification of the electoral college.

POLITICAL WRAP: Georgia Senate Runoff; GOP Members Challenge Electoral College Count

CHARLOTTE, N.C. – A busy week ahead as the outcome of the Georgia runoff election will determine which party controls the U.S. Senate.

President Donald Trump and President-elect Joe Biden will both be in the Peach State tomorrow, campaigning ahead of Tuesday’s election.

Then Wednesday, a showdown in Washington, as a dozen Republican senators vow not to certify Joe Biden’s victory, until there’s an emergency investigation into the election.

That’s despite no credible evidence of widespread voter fraud.

Our political contributor Mary C. Curtis gives us her take.

Mary C. Curtis: Biden Moves Forward, But Does Trump?

CHARLOTTE, NC — Attorney General Bill Barr says the Justice Department has not found voter fraud that would change the outcome of the election.

It comes as battleground states such as Arizona and Wisconsin certify election victories for Joe Biden.

WCCB political contributor Mary C. Curtis has more.

You can also check out Mary’s podcast ‘Equal Time.’

Can Bernie Sanders change his luck in the South?

OPINION — Bernie Sanders spent the weekend on a Southern swing, which makes sense. The Vermont senator’s failure to connect with enough core Democratic voters the last time around — in the South, that means black voters, and black women in particular — stalled his campaign for the party’s presidential nomination. He hit a wall in the early primary state of South Carolina, losing badly to Hillary Clinton, and he never recovered.

After This Election, the NRA Is No Longer Calling All the Shots

OPINION — The only thing that stops a bad guy with a gun is a good guy with a gun. It’s the mantra of the National Rifle Association, and a certainty for those who would brook no incursion into Second Amendment rights and definitely no gun control measures, no matter how small or “sensible,” as they are often described by those who propose them.

When children were gunned down at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Connecticut, in 2012, and federal legislation that would strengthen background checkswent nowhere, gun control advocates despaired. If the murder of children failed to crack the gun lobby, what would?

But real-life events and political surprises indicate that the landscape might be changing. And the work of groups such as the Brady Campaign to Prevent Gun ViolenceMoms Demand Action for Gun Sense in America, the Giffords Law Center to Prevent Gun Violence and other large and small organizations has made a difference.

Where once politicians were loath to cross the NRA because of the organization’s hefty purse and powerful get-out-the-vote success, candidates in unlikely places are showing that a nuanced position is not a deal breaker. Earlier this month, Democrat Lucy McBath, a onetime spokesperson for Moms Demand Action for Gun Sense, won a House seat in Georgia that Newt Gingrich once held, no doubt surprising some leaders in her own party. Though the district has been trending away from its once deep-red hue for a while, a well-financed race by Democrat Jon Ossoff last year that engendered enthusiasm could not achieve what McBath did with far less attention.