Mary C. Curtis: Georgia Senate Runoff Races

CHARLOTTE, NC — Democrat Raphael Warnock is set become the first Black U.S. senator from Georgia. Warnock defeated incumbent Republican Kelly Loeffler in Tuesday’s runoff elections. The other runoff race between Republican David Perdue and Democratic challenger John Ossoff is still too close to call. The party that wins the race between Ossoff and Perdue will take control of the senate.

WCCB political contributor Mary C. Curtis has more on the high-stakes race.

You can catch Mary C. Curtis on Sunday nights at 6:30 PM on WCCB Charlotte’s CW discussing the biggest issues in local and national politics and also giving us a look at what’s ahead for the week.

You can also check out Mary’s podcast ‘Equal Time.’

 

President Trump and The Georgia Phone Call

President Trump is again insisting he won Georgia and says he wants to find the votes that proves he did.   The President pressing that issue during a phone call with Georgia Secretary of State Brad Raffensperger and legal staff. We examine the call and some the other issues for a critical political week in America that includes a Georgia U.S. Senate runoff election that will determine political power in the senate and the certification of the electoral college.

POLITICAL WRAP: Georgia Senate Runoff; GOP Members Challenge Electoral College Count

CHARLOTTE, N.C. – A busy week ahead as the outcome of the Georgia runoff election will determine which party controls the U.S. Senate.

President Donald Trump and President-elect Joe Biden will both be in the Peach State tomorrow, campaigning ahead of Tuesday’s election.

Then Wednesday, a showdown in Washington, as a dozen Republican senators vow not to certify Joe Biden’s victory, until there’s an emergency investigation into the election.

That’s despite no credible evidence of widespread voter fraud.

Our political contributor Mary C. Curtis gives us her take.

Mary C. Curtis: Biden Moves Forward, But Does Trump?

CHARLOTTE, NC — Attorney General Bill Barr says the Justice Department has not found voter fraud that would change the outcome of the election.

It comes as battleground states such as Arizona and Wisconsin certify election victories for Joe Biden.

WCCB political contributor Mary C. Curtis has more.

You can also check out Mary’s podcast ‘Equal Time.’

Can Bernie Sanders change his luck in the South?

OPINION — Bernie Sanders spent the weekend on a Southern swing, which makes sense. The Vermont senator’s failure to connect with enough core Democratic voters the last time around — in the South, that means black voters, and black women in particular — stalled his campaign for the party’s presidential nomination. He hit a wall in the early primary state of South Carolina, losing badly to Hillary Clinton, and he never recovered.

After This Election, the NRA Is No Longer Calling All the Shots

OPINION — The only thing that stops a bad guy with a gun is a good guy with a gun. It’s the mantra of the National Rifle Association, and a certainty for those who would brook no incursion into Second Amendment rights and definitely no gun control measures, no matter how small or “sensible,” as they are often described by those who propose them.

When children were gunned down at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Connecticut, in 2012, and federal legislation that would strengthen background checkswent nowhere, gun control advocates despaired. If the murder of children failed to crack the gun lobby, what would?

But real-life events and political surprises indicate that the landscape might be changing. And the work of groups such as the Brady Campaign to Prevent Gun ViolenceMoms Demand Action for Gun Sense in America, the Giffords Law Center to Prevent Gun Violence and other large and small organizations has made a difference.

Where once politicians were loath to cross the NRA because of the organization’s hefty purse and powerful get-out-the-vote success, candidates in unlikely places are showing that a nuanced position is not a deal breaker. Earlier this month, Democrat Lucy McBath, a onetime spokesperson for Moms Demand Action for Gun Sense, won a House seat in Georgia that Newt Gingrich once held, no doubt surprising some leaders in her own party. Though the district has been trending away from its once deep-red hue for a while, a well-financed race by Democrat Jon Ossoff last year that engendered enthusiasm could not achieve what McBath did with far less attention.

The State of America’s Election System

CHARLOTTE, NC — The United States of confusion – at least that’s one way to describe the way we run our elections, with each state responsible for its own elections system. That doesn’t cause much controversy when the margin of victory or defeat is wide enough, so a few thousand votes one way or another won’t affect the outcome. But when elections are close – as many are in these divided times – it’s an invitation to lawsuits, chaos and doubts from voters on whether and if their ballots count, or are counted. The 2018 midterm elections show just how this formula does and does not work.

One Person, One Vote. Is It That Complicated?

OPINION — I admit that voting is and has always been a celebratory ritual for me, even if the candidate is running unopposed, the office is state agriculture commissioner or my district’s makeup means my one vote won’t make much of a difference.

I watched three older siblings march for civil rights, and I am well aware that many brave folks died protecting my right to cast that ballot. While a little rain or a busy schedule might provide an excuse to “sit this one out,” it’s never enough to outweigh the legacy left by a Medgar Evers, who served his country in World War II and was murdered in front of his Mississippi home for, among other civil rights activity, leading voter registration drives in the country he protected.

Mine is not a controversial stand — in fact, it’s patriotic. You would think our country’s leaders, without regard to party or politics, would be on my side.

You would be wrong.

Opinion: A Not Entirely Unexpected Campaign Roadblock for Women of Color

The women of color who are still standing in an electoral slog that ends in November know their road to continued success will be hard. This is the United States, and the fact that they are still pioneers for getting this far in 2018 is not just news-making but also a little depressing.

It is also true that they can’t always count on the support of some of the same feminists they may have joined — in marches, #MeToo protests and the ballot box.

Women Score Big in Key Primaries

In the United States, an African-American woman has never been elected governor. That may happen in 2018 if Stacey Abrams is elected in Georgia. Though she has a tough road, she passed the first hurdle Tuesday night when she was overwhelmingly chosen to be the Democrats’ nominee. In many states, in races for state and federal offices, women are stepping up. What are their chances in November? It’s unclear for now – but you can’t win if you’re not playing, and this election season, women are definitely in it.