POLITICAL WRAP: Coronavirus Concerns; Biden and Bernie Super Tuesday Battle

CHARLOTTE, N.C. – Mixed messages from the Trump administration on the Coronavirus.

And on the campaign trail, it’s essentially down to two candidates for the Democratic nomination.

Former Vice President Joe Biden is racking up endorsements, most recently from former candidate, Senator Kamala Harris.

Meantime, Senator Bernie Sanders is looking to Michigan and its 125 delegates ahead of the next Super Tuesday.

The Heat: Biden, Sanders lead Super Tuesday

The Democratic party is now divided between a progressive candidate and a moderate.

The contest for the Democratic nomination involved nearly three dozen candidates at one point.

Only a handful are still officially in the race. But just two have the best chance of winning the nomination. Joe Biden won most of the Super Tuesday primaries and took over the delegate lead from Senator Bernie Sanders.

To discuss all of this:

North Carolina played third fiddle on Super Tuesday. It won’t in November

OPINION — Yes, Texas and California were the big delegate prizes on Super Tuesday. But don’t forget No. 3, North Carolina — politicians of both parties certainly won’t.

The Tar Heel State has been a battleground for votes and issues for both parties for years. While South Carolina drew all the attention as the first-in-the-South primary, North Carolina, because of the politics and policies that resonate beyond its borders, will remain in the spotlight through the 2020 election season.

Different from its neighbors — the usually reliably red South Carolina and the increasingly blue Virginia to its north —decidedly purple North Carolina keeps everyone guessing. (Though its Super Tuesday result reflected the primary outcomes in South Carolina and Virginia, with former Vice President Joe Biden winning handily and Sen. Bernie Sanders in second place.)

Mary C. Curtis: Super Tuesday Results

CHARLOTTE, NC — Joe Biden’s campaign getting new life after a successful Super Tuesday but Bernie Sanders isn’t far behind. Political contributor Mary C. Curtis breaks down the results and how the other races played out.

Charlotte Talks: After Biden’s Comeback, 2020 Race Faces Super Tuesday Lightning Round

While the voting was still underway in South Carolina on Saturday, the former vice president made a quick side trip to Raleigh.

“Put me in coach, I’m ready to play,” Biden said at a rally at St. Augustine’s University.

If North Carolina voters on Tuesday give him back-to-back Carolina victories, Biden said “it’s a straight path to a nomination for president of the United States of America.”

But recent polls indicated a close race in North Carolina between Biden and Sen. Bernie Sanders. Biden also appeared to be out-organized and lacking resources in many Super Tuesday states, particularly delegate-rich California.

What will the South Carolina results do to the Democratic landscape with so little time before Tuesday’s vote?

GUESTS

Mary C. Curtis, Roll Call columnist, WCCB News contributor (@mcurtisnc3)

Jim Morrill, the Charlotte Observer, political reporter (@jimmorrill)

Gibbs Knotts, College of Charleston, professor of political science; co-author of “First in the South: Why South Carolina’s Presidential Primary Matters” (@GibbsKnotts)

POLITICAL WRAP: Mayor Pete Drops Out; Biden Momentum; Trump Rally in Charlotte

CHARLOTTE, N.C. – According to AP sources, former South Bend, Indiana Mayor Pete Buttigieg is suspending his presidential campaign.

And Joe Biden is playing the role of “Comeback Kid” after a big win in the Palmetto State on Saturday.

And President Trump returns to Charlotte for a campaign rally, one day before Super Tuesday.

Click above for more with WCCB Charlotte Political Contributor Mary C. Curtis.

Charlotte Talks Local News Roundup: Biden Seeks Comeback In SC Primary; CMS Irks Parents With Survey

The caucus results in Nevada had barely been tallied before the Democratic candidates for president packed their bags for South Carolina and Saturday’s “first in the South” primary. So Charlotte Talks has set up shop, too, at Amelie’s French Bakery in Rock Hill.

Former Vice President Joe Biden put all his chips on South Carolina in an attempt to retake frontrunner status from Sen. Bernie Sanders. The tide might be in Biden’s favor as polls show him with a commanding lead, and the state’s top African American official, Rep. Jim Clyburn, endorsed Biden.

Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools found itself having to explain why students in grades 6-12 were given a survey about their gender identity and sexual orientation. The school board, meanwhile, had to scale back the size of three high schools that were part of a bond package voters approved in 2017.

Also, the will-he-stay, won’t-he-stay question about Cam Newton seemed to be resolved this week, and the CIAA tipped off it’s last (for now?) tournament in Charlotte.

GUESTS

Mary C. Curtis, Roll Call columnist and WCCB News contributor (@mcurtisnc3)

Cailyn Derickson, The Herald, reporter (@cailynderickson)

Steve Harrison, WFAE political reporter, co-host of the “Inside Politics” podcast (@Sharrison_WFAE)

Jonathan Lowe, Spectrum News, reporter and anchor (@JonathanUpdates)

Ann Doss Helms, WFAE education reporter (@anndosshelms)

Could a short-term Bloomberg solution doom Democrats in the long term?

OPINION — Mike Bloomberg, the former New York mayor, has been busy on the campaign trail, said “Late Show” host Stephen Colbert, “shaking hands and frisking babies.” Taking a more solemn tone in his monologue, “Daily Show” host Trevor Noah, a South African native who knows firsthand the effects of raw, racial animus, said in part: “So my problem with Mike Bloomberg is he’s not saying, ‘I’m sorry for targeting black people. I’m sorry for treating black people like second-class citizens. I’m sorry for gaslighting black people for so long.’ No, he’s just, like, ‘I’m sorry that stop-and-frisk happened to affect black communities.’ And it’s, like, no, it didn’t happen to. You designed it to.”

Bloomberg can look forward to that and more as long as he remains in the race to represent the Democratic Party in November against Donald Trump.

South Carolina Democratic Debate

CHARLOTTE, NC — Political contributor Mary C. Curtis discusses the winners and losers from the South Carolina democratic debate and what it means heading into the Saturday primary and super Tuesday.

Using Faith To Fight For The Poor

WCCB Charlotte Political Contributor Mary C. Curtis writes in Time Magazine about a North Carolina pastor who says “there is not some separation between Jesus and justice.” She talks about his fight for the poor as WCCB News Rising celebrates Black History Month.

The Poor People’s Campaign: A National Call for Moral Revival hopes to draw thousands to WashingtonDC on June 20.