Chaos At The Capitol: What’s Next For Democracy?

On Wednesday, the U.S. Capitol was breached by pro-Trump supporters while Congress was in session. The business at hand was to count the votes of the Electoral College. The mission of the protesters was to stop the count in efforts to overturn an election they believe – incorrectly – was illegitimate.

It was set to be a history-making day because a group of Republican lawmakers was planning on objecting to the electoral votes of certain states. It turned out to be history-making for a different reason: an insurrection.

Understanding what happened Wednesday and what must happen now is paramount — we take a first crack at that as we sit down with analysts and experts and get your reaction.

Terrorism in DC

Terrorists storm the U.S. Capitol, the Georgia elections and more.

When churches need protection, it’s not normal, it’s dangerous. And it’s a sign of trouble to come

The end of an old year prompts not just relief for a 2020 in the rearview mirror, and optimism for the new one ahead that has to be better, but also a chance for that last look back. Which stories lodged in the headlines, and which ones disappeared all too quickly?

As Washington prepared for an onslaught of pro-Trump demonstrations this week, organized by those who refused to accept the president’s defeat and hoped to rattle officials with a last grasp at power, I could not forget the damage from the last time supporters of President Donald Trump visited D.C., when the grounds and property of Black churches were vandalized. That drew not nearly enough outrage, or at least it seemed that way.

For his next act, Trump invited his followers to flood the U.S. Capitol on Wednesday to protest as Congress counted the state-certified electoral votes in a democratic process that is usually routine.

Mary C. Curtis: Georgia Senate Runoff Races

CHARLOTTE, NC — Democrat Raphael Warnock is set become the first Black U.S. senator from Georgia. Warnock defeated incumbent Republican Kelly Loeffler in Tuesday’s runoff elections. The other runoff race between Republican David Perdue and Democratic challenger John Ossoff is still too close to call. The party that wins the race between Ossoff and Perdue will take control of the senate.

WCCB political contributor Mary C. Curtis has more on the high-stakes race.

You can catch Mary C. Curtis on Sunday nights at 6:30 PM on WCCB Charlotte’s CW discussing the biggest issues in local and national politics and also giving us a look at what’s ahead for the week.

You can also check out Mary’s podcast ‘Equal Time.’

 

President Trump and The Georgia Phone Call

President Trump is again insisting he won Georgia and says he wants to find the votes that proves he did.   The President pressing that issue during a phone call with Georgia Secretary of State Brad Raffensperger and legal staff. We examine the call and some the other issues for a critical political week in America that includes a Georgia U.S. Senate runoff election that will determine political power in the senate and the certification of the electoral college.

POLITICAL WRAP: Georgia Senate Runoff; GOP Members Challenge Electoral College Count

CHARLOTTE, N.C. – A busy week ahead as the outcome of the Georgia runoff election will determine which party controls the U.S. Senate.

President Donald Trump and President-elect Joe Biden will both be in the Peach State tomorrow, campaigning ahead of Tuesday’s election.

Then Wednesday, a showdown in Washington, as a dozen Republican senators vow not to certify Joe Biden’s victory, until there’s an emergency investigation into the election.

That’s despite no credible evidence of widespread voter fraud.

Our political contributor Mary C. Curtis gives us her take.

Mary C. Curtis: Will Lawmakers Increase Stimulus Money?

CHARLOTTE, NC — President Donald Trump is pushing for higher COVID payouts as Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell blocks a vote on them in the Senate.

WCCB political contributor Mary C. Curtis discusses the latest from Washington and what it means moving forward.

You can catch Mary C. Curtis on Sunday nights at 6:30 PM on WCCB Charlotte’s CW discussing the biggest issues in local and national politics and also giving us a look at what’s ahead for the week.

You can also check out Mary’s podcast ‘Equal Time.’

POLITICAL WRAP: Stimulus on Hold as President Trump Pushes for $2,000 Checks

CHARLOTTE, N.C. – The stimulus bill remains unsigned as President Trump digs in on his demand to increase direct payments to Americans.

“I am asking Congress to amend this bill and increase the ridiculously low $600 dollars to $2,000 dollars or $4,000 dollars for a couple. I’m also asking Congress to immediately get rid of the wasteful and unnecessary items from this legislation,” the President said last week.

Interview: Mint Museum Curator Jen Edwards on Photographer Ruben Natal-San Miguel and Running a Museum During Covid

“What makes an online exhibition unique?” I asked Jen Edwards, Chief Curator at The Mint Museum in Charlotte, NC, over Zoom one afternoon in early December. “It has to translate well,” she responded. “That’s why Ruben was so perfect.”

She’s referring to Ruben Natal-San Miguel, the photographer whose latest solo show Expanding the Pantheon: Women R Beautiful kicks off The Mint’s online exhibition offerings. Citing the images’ vibrant dynamism, she added, “There’s a bold color, there’s a dramatic feature, whether it’s the person’s face or something about the background. They’re really great as graphic images. And so that makes it perfect to translate online.”

Equal Time: Faith and politics

The late evangelist Billy Graham, known as America’s pastor, was as world famous as the presidents who sought face time with him. But after a friendship with Richard Nixon affected that image, Graham backed away from the political spotlight. His son has chosen a different path. Mary C. Curtis speaks with the Rev. Franklin Graham.