POLITICAL WRAP: Biden Prepares Transition; Trump Refuses to Concede

CHARLOTTE, N.C. – After an historic election, President-Elect Joe Biden is preparing his transition team, while President Donald Trump and his closest allies, refuse to concede.

With the results showing a divided nation, how can the country come together?

Our political contributor Mary C. Curtis gives us her take in the video above.

2020 ‘Harris Has the Potential To Change the Face of U.S. Politics’

When Kamala Harris takes the oath of office on January 20, 2021, more than one ceiling will shatter: America will have its first woman vice president, as well as its first Black and South Asian-American vice president. She will be second in line for the most powerful office in the world.

Once the presidential election was called for Joe Biden Saturday, social media—and streets—erupted with enthusiasm from people who were even more thrilled about his running mate. These are Americans who now see new doors open for their daughters, their immigrant families, themselves.

In North Carolina, red and blue don’t make purple

North Carolina is a political player, a battleground state visited and fought over by national candidates in both parties. And Charlotte has had challenges that mirror those of many big American cities: protests and debates over police reform and frustrations that all citizens don’t share in its economic growth and opportunity. Mary C. Curtis speaks to Charlotte Mayor Vi Lyles about the election and what comes next.

POLITICAL WRAP: Two Days until the Election

CHARLOTTE, N.C. – Two days until Election Day and early voting records show a tight race and an involved electorate.

Candidates and their families are flooding North Carolina in the closing days of the campaign.

So, will we know the results on Election Night?

Some political experts say we might not know who won for days or weeks.

Our political contributor Mary C. Curtis gives us her take as we approach Election Day.

It’s Time to Cover Black Women as the Norm and Not the “Other”

Though I’ve seen the way the media portray Black women evolve over time, I don’t think I’ve ever seen it done exactly right — or at least with the complexity and nuance we deserve. I say we intentionally, though journalists are not supposed to be part of the story. But seeing — and not seeing — myself in the newspapers my family read and the television news shows we watched was what spurred me to choose the profession.

Or, maybe it was the reason the profession chose me.

Now, with Black women rising in visibility in fields from culture to politics, journalists are being tested in reporting on a group of Americans who have been, at turns, ignored and stereotyped. I have viewed the situation from the inside and outside.

What’s in a name? Identity, pride and love. Ask Kamala Harris

Every person’s name is special. It demands respect.

I learned how seriously I felt about that at a pre-coronavirus conference, when a speaker who fancied himself Don Rickles but came off more like the rude uncle at a holiday party, prefaced his remarks with a self-styled roast. It supposedly poked “fun” at the attendees, including, apparently, those he barely knew. (And frankly, except for an occasional greeting at conferences past, I did not know this man from a can of paint.)

Mary C. Curtis: Candidates Try to Close Deal in North Carolina

CHARLOTTE, NC — Less than 2 weeks until election day and both campaigns are making their rounds to key states including, North Carolina.

WCCB political contributor Mary C. Curtis talks about the candidates final push ahead of November 3rd.

The Heat: U.S. vice presidential debate

Compared to last week’s presidential debate filled with interruptions, Wednesday’s encounter between Vice President Mike Pence and the challenger – Senator Kamala Harris – was relatively civil.

Then earlier today, shortly after debate organizers announced the next presidential debate would now be virtual – President Trump said he would no longer participate.

CGTN’s White House correspondent Nathan King has the details.

To discuss:

  • Jadan Horyn is a writer and conservative commentator.
  • Mary C. Curtis is a columnist for “Roll Call’ and host of the “Equal Time” podcast.
  • Joel Rubin is democratic strategist
  • Amy Holmes is a writer for HBO’s “Real Time with Bill Maher” and a columnist from the Swiss weekly, “Die Weltwoche.”

Mary C. Curtis: Vice Presidential Debate Preview

CHARLOTTE, NC —  Less than 30 days until election day and Wednesday night vice president Mike Pence and senator Kamala Harris will go face to face in Salt Lake city – in the first and only vice presidential debate.

WCCB Political contributor Mary C. Curtis has a preview of the debate and why it matters.

Democrats offer virtual vision for an inclusive America. Your turn, Republicans

It turns out the crowds, the balloons and confetti were merely froufrou, just window dressing. Stripped down, it was even easier for the themes of this week’s Democratic National Convention — and the party’s vision for the future — to break through.

The Democrats’ unity on display could be a bit ripe for parody, for sure, a little like seeing Sylvester and Tweety Bird declaring a temporary truce before the inevitable chase continues. The scenes of comity — Republicans crossing over to extol the character of Joe Biden, progressives vowing to work with moderates — would most certainly be replaced by the usual infighting and struggles for policy influence even, or especially, if Democrats win big in November. That’s the Democratic and (small “d” democratic) way.

Sometimes a “big tent” gets awfully crowded, and messy. And with Democrats, the mess can sometimes overwhelm the message or, as in 2016 when Bernie Sanders’ supporters were still complaining loudly on the convention floor, consume it.

But that oft-used expression, that diversity is America’s strength, so often mocked as cliché, still has the ability to provoke a sentimental misty eye if offered with sincerity. And when a loud segment of America obviously rejects it, captured on way too many angry viral videos — well, that’s when it becomes more important to protect the promise.

“Uniting America” has been the message of the Democratic National Convention and the party’s campaign, virtual and otherwise, moving into the fall. Democrats are betting the country is exhausted and pushed to the brink by challenges that an entertainer in chief is ill-equipped to handle.