Breaking the 1,000-Word Barrier & Finding Support for the Journey at #Muse17

I managed to make The Muse and the Marketplace conference book fair by the skin of my teeth—or, rather, by an essay. While other conference presenters, novelists and non-fiction writers alike, celebrated one, two, three and more books, my chapter in Love Her, Love Her Not: The Hillary Paradox got me a corner of the table. But that’s OK, or so I learned at this year’s writing conference. Letting that lesson sink in was one reason I traveled to Boston for an enlightening and, as it turned out, soul-searching weekend.

Vol. 1: Mary C. Curtis Writes Because the Problem is Not “Fake News”

Writing, today, seems different, especially when you write and report on issues of politics, culture, and race, as I do. Growing up, journalism as a profession had always felt a little sketchy to me—and not just because my mother thought doctor or lawyer seemed a lot surer a bet for an African-American girl raised in West Baltimore, trying to make something of herself. It was also because the job of observing the world to make sense of it seemed not to fit the description of “job” I grew up on.