Archives for August 2022

Local News Roundup: Auction at the Epicentre; CMS teacher vacancies; Airline cancellations; Optimist Hall paid parking

After two postponed auctions, the Epicentre was finally sold at auction this week to the highest and only bidder, for a bid of $95 million. The buyer is the same bank that lent the money to the Epicentre’s former owner.

Get ready to open your wallet if you go to Optimist Hall after August 15. Parking fees will now be charged, to the tune of $18. Why the change?

With just a few weeks to go, there are still hundreds of teacher vacancies at Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools. We’ll have an update.

And a transportation update including a new light rail stop, news from the Charlotte Regional Transportation Planning Organization and more.

Mike Collins and our roundtable of reporters delve into those stories and all the week’s top local and regional news on the Charlotte Talks local news roundup.

Guests:

Joe Bruno, WSOC-TV reporter

Mary C. Curtis, columnist for Rollcall.com, host of the Rollcall podcast “Equal Time”

Claire Donnelly, WFAE health reporter

Danielle Chemtob, investigative reporter with Axios Charlotte

When it’s staring you in the face, it just might be the truth

“Who are you going to believe, me or your lying eyes?”

The phrase has morphed from hackneyed joke to cliche to words to live by.

When I saw the street scene from the familiar city of Tucson, Ariz., it looked like a creation of Claes Oldenburg. But this tableau of a port-a-potty sliding into a plastic heap in the Southwestern heat was reality, not art object, something I doubt the artist, who recently died at 93 after a career of creativity, could ever have imagined.

When I lived in Tucson 30-plus years ago, we certainly had our hot days, ones where the sun seemed to be sitting on your shoulders with no relief in the weather report. But I don’t remember witnessing anything like that.

Yet, that image and so many more — wildfires all over the world, buckling airport runways and Texas roadways “bleeding” the binder that holds them together — have resulted in solutions that could only be described as temporary. Wrapping London’s Hammersmith Bridge in foil or coating Phoenix streets with a gray emulsion might work, but for how long?

And what’s to become of the iconic Tour de France? The first yellow jersey donned by the bicycle race leader in 1919 was made of wool, the thought of which is more than scary in 2022, when riders and spectators risked their lives while navigating twisty routes throughout that broiling country.

What are leaders doing about a long-term threat we feel in our cities, our homes and our bodies?

Hedging, dissembling and putting it off on our children and grandchildren, who must be thrilled at yet another problem left by the grown-ups.